Dealing With a Psoriasis Flare-up

If you have psoriasis, you may choose your wardrobe and even your activities based on how active your disease is. The inflamed, itchy, scaly plaques that cover your skin can make you feel self-conscious and affect the way that others react to you, too.

Our expert dermatologists at Specialists in Dermatology in Houston, and The Woodlands, Texas, offer cutting-edge, effective psoriasis therapies — including topical and oral medications, and biologics —to clear your skin quickly and beautifully. If you do have a flare-up, here are a few tips on how to stay comfortable until you can get treatment.

Keep your skin moist and cool

According to the National Psoriasis Foundation, moisturizing your skin with heavy, fragrance-free creams or lotions helps lock in moisture so that your plaques can heal. Moisturizing every day also helps keep your skin healthy between flare-ups. 

You can use body creams, facial creams, or high-quality oils, such as coconut oil, to moisturize your skin and lock in water. Other tips include:

You can also refrigerate your cleansers and moisturizers for extra cooling relief.

Take time to unwind

You probably feel anxious and upset when you notice you’ve broken out in plaques or rashes again, but emotional distress actually makes psoriasis worse. Take the time to soothe yourself and relax by:

Even spending time with friends can help you let off steam. Consider joining a psoriasis support group to help you manage the challenge of flare-ups.

Eat more greens and healthy fats

Although your ideal diet is based on your unique metabolism and biochemistry, almost every woman and man benefits from eating more fresh green vegetables, low-glycemic fruits, and healthy fats, such as omega 3s.  Some research suggests, too, that losing weight can reduce psoriasis flare-ups. In addition to filling your diet with more fruits and vegetables, try cutting out foods that are nutrient-poor and may contribute to inflammation, including processed foods and beverages, sugar, and corn syrup.

Get a little sun

Both topical vitamin D and the vitamin D your body produces after sun exposure may help quiet your flare-up. However, be sure not to stay in the sun for more than roughly 10 minutes without sunscreen. Use a sunscreen that has an SPF of at least 30 and is fragrance- and irritant-free.

Treat your skin

No matter whether your psoriasis is mild, moderate, or severe, our dermatologists help you find relief from itchy, embarrassing plaques. We custom-design your therapy based on the type and severity of your psoriasis.

To set up a psoriasis consultation, call us today, or book online at either of our offices. 

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